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Undergraduate Academic Policies

Absences from all Classes
Students who have been called away from all classes due to an emergency (serious illness, hospitalization, death of a parent, etc.) or due to military orders will need to provide documentation of the circumstances to their instructors and will be expected to contact each instructor to discuss making up the work missed.

Absences from Final Examinations
A student who fails to attend the final examination of a course and who has a passing grade up to that time may be given a grade of I (Incomplete). The Committee on Absence of the Division of Student Affairs reviews excuses concerning absences from final examinations and informs instructors of its decisions.

Students scheduled for more than three examinations in one day may have their examination schedule adjusted if they notify the instructor or department of the examination offered in the fourth time slot by the midpoint of the semester. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of the date and time of the final examination for each of his or her classes before officially enrolling. See the Enrollment and Student Academic Information Bulletin (Office of the Registrar) each semester for further information.

Absences from Scheduled Classes
With the exception of days covered by the Religious Observances Policy and Procedures of Indiana University, illness or military orders are usually the only acceptable excuses for absence from class. Absences must be explained to the satisfaction of the instructor who will decide whether omitted work may be made up.  In all cases of absences other than those following the Religious Observance Policy and Procedures, however, it is the individual instructor who decides whether or not to excuse an absence and/or to allow missed work to be submitted.

Academic Checklist
Students on academic checklist will not be allowed to register until they meet with an academic assistant dean in the Undergraduate Academic Affairs Office. Students may be placed on checklist for a number of reasons, including academic probation and dismissal.

Academic Misconduct
Plagiarism and cheating undermine the academic environment. Students who cheat undermine their own education, the self-esteem that comes with true mastery, and the academic mission of the University. The regulations governing student academic conduct and the procedures that must be used in handling violations of those regulations are covered in the Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities, and Conduct.(Part II.G. [Student Responsibilities] defines academic misconduct, and Part II.B. [Disciplinary Procedures]) explains the procedures for handling cases of academic misconduct.

Academic Policies and Procedures
In planning their academic programs, students should be aware of the following policies and procedures of the College of Arts and Sciences:

  1. The degree requirements that will apply to an undergraduate student pursuing a degree in the College of Arts and Sciences at Bloomington will be those in effect at the time he or she matriculated at Indiana University (any campus) as a degree-seeking student. Students admitted for the fall semester who elect to take courses in the preceding summer will be bound by the degree requirements in effect for the fall for which they are admitted. A student who fails to complete a degree within eight years of matriculation will be placed on new degree requirements.
  2. Only elective courses may be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. For more information, see Pass/Fail Option under "Academic Regulations" in the College Bulletin.
  3. No more than 60 credit hours earned in accredited junior colleges may be applied toward a degree.
  4. With permission of the dean of the College of Arts & Sciences, course credit may be earned by satisfactory performance on departmentally approved examinations.
  5. Courses taken by correspondence may not be counted toward degree requirements in the College of Arts & Sciences without prior special permission from the Undergraduate Academic Affairs Office.
  6. Candidates for degrees must have all credits on record at least six weeks prior to the conferral of degrees, except that of the current semester.
  7. An application for a degree must be submitted online to the College Recorder’s Office, Owen Hall. This should be done no later than June 1 for May graduation, no later than December 1 for August graduation, and no later than March 1 for December graduation. Failure to file by these deadlines may delay graduation.
  8. Degrees are conferred in December, May, and August; Commencement ceremonies are held in May and in December. Candidates for degrees in August may participate in the May Commencement.

Changing/Declaring Majors and Minors
In order to change their major, students must meet with the academic advisor in the department of their proposed new major. The advisor will submit a Major or School Change Request to the College Recorder's Office for processing. For the Bachelor of Arts degree, students may declare a double major (or triple major) with concentrations in two (or three) separate subject areas inside the College of Arts and Sciences. Students interested in other degree combinations should refer to the College policy on Second Bachelor’s Degrees.

To declare a minor, students must contact the academic undergraduate advisor in the department that offers the proposed minor. Students may complete a maximum of 3 minors recognized by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Commencement
The College graduates students in December, May, and August each year. August graduates can participate in the previous May’s Commencement ceremonies and may have their names in the program. December graduates may participate in the December graduation ceremony. Commencement is organized by the Office of University Ceremonies. Information regarding commencement ceremonies is available on their website.

Confidentiality of Records
Indiana University, in compliance with the General Education Provisions Act, Section 438, titled Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), provides that all student records are confidential. Confidential academic information is released by the College of Arts and Sciences only to the student, and to person(s) whom the student authorizes in writing to be recipients of the information. Forms authorizing the release of information to third parties (including parents or guardian) are available online or at the College Recorder’s Office. References, recommendations, and other similar documents may carry a voluntary waiver relinquishing the student’s right to review this specific material. Students may review their records upon request and may ask for deletions or corrections of the record in a hearing process described in detail in the Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities, and Conduct.

Correspondence Courses
Courses taken by correspondence may not be applied to any degree requirement in the College of Arts and Sciences without prior special permission of the Dean.

Cross Listing Courses between Majors
Whether a student plans two or three majors, a total of only one course may be cross listed.

Course Overloads
For Course Overloads during Continuing Student Registration for a regular fall or spring term, students may contact the College Recorderís Office directly for permission to enroll in up to 23 credits. Requests to go beyond 23 credits still will require deanís approval. Note: During the late drop & add period, students will continue to be able to add up to 23 credits without permission. No course overloads will be allowed during the summer term since the Office of the Registrar allows students to register for a maximum of 20 credit hours for the entire summer or, broken down by session: 4 week session a total of 6 hours, either a 6 or an 8 week session a total of 10 hours, the 12 week session or for the entire summer combined a total of 20 hours.

Degrees awarded with Distinction
The College recognizes outstanding performance in course work by awarding bachelor’s degrees with three levels of distinction: Distinction (3.700), High Distinction (3.800), and Highest Distinction (3.900). Students must have a minimum of 60 graded credit hours at Indiana University to be considered for distinction degrees. The College of Arts & Sciences calculates grades with three decimals without rounding.

Departmental Honors Program
Most departments in the College of Arts and Sciences offer honors programs for outstanding students who have the opportunity to take advanced seminars as well as pursue independent study and research. Honors programs vary among departments; they may include comprehensive exams, theses, research projects, and creative endeavors. Students must have a minimum College of Arts and Sciences cumulative grade point average of 3.300 and the approval of the department chairperson or departmental honors committee for admission. Students must maintain this minimum average to be graduated with honors. A potential candidate for honors should consult as soon as possible with the departmental honors advisor or the chairperson of the department about requirements. Students wishing to earn honors in two different departments must complete a distinct body of work for each honors notation.

Eight-Year Rule
Students who fail to complete a degree within eight years of their matriculation will forfeit the automatic right to use the degree requirements in place at the time of matriculation. These students will follow new degree requirements and should contact the College Recorder’s Office for more information.

FN Grading Policy
The course grade of FN is used to indicate failure due to student nonattendance, and provides a distinction between an "F" grade awarded for failing performance and an "F" grade assigned for nonattendance. The instructor will provide the last date of documented class attendance or participation whenever the "FN" grade is assigned. The grade that will appear on the student grade report and academic record when an "FN" grade is assigned will be "F." The "N" portion of the "FN" grade and the last attendance date will be retained on the student's record as internal notations only that can subsequently be used to identify an unofficial withdrawal and to determine the appropriate return amount for any federally defined financial aid that had been awarded to the student.

Grade Appeals and Retroactive Changes
Appeals of grades should be resolved with the instructor who recorded the disputed grade. If the student and instructor cannot resolve the matter, the student should discuss it further with the chair of the department offering the course. Appeals unresolved at the department level may be referred to the academic assistant deans. Appeals of grades or requests for other actions after the conclusion of a course should be made as soon as possible. Such requests will not be considered after one calendar year from the end of the semester in which the course in question was taken. Note that grades of I (Incomplete) or W (Withdrawal) may not be recorded for a course when a student has taken the final exam, or completed the final paper or project for the course.

Grade of Incomplete
A grade of I (Incomplete) may be given only when the work of the course is substantially completed and when the student’s work is of passing quality. A grade of I may not be given when a student has taken the final exam or completed the final paper or project for the course. When an I is assigned, a record must be maintained in the office of the department in which the grade was given. The record will include a statement of the reason for recording the I and an adequate guide for its removal and a suggested final grade in case the instructor should leave campus for an extended time.

The time allowed for the removal of an I may not exceed one calendar year from the date of its recording, although the Dean may authorize adjustment of this period in exceptional circumstances.

To complete a course in which a student received a grade of I, the student should consult with the instructor. The student should not reenroll in the course.

By assigning an I, an instructor implicitly authorizes and requires the I to be changed to an F at the end of one calendar year if that instructor does not act to remove the I. The registrar will automatically change the I to an F at the end of this time period. Both the student and the instructor in whose course the student received the I will be notified of this change of grade.

These regulations do not apply to research and reading courses in which completion of the work of the course is not necessarily required at the end of the semester and the grade R (Deferred) is given. Once a student has graduated, nothing in these regulations shall prohibit the I from remaining on the record.

Graduate-Level Course Work
Under normal circumstances undergraduate students should not be enrolled in graduate-level courses. If, however, the instructor, the department and the student agree that the course is appropriate given the student’s academic goals and interests and that he/she is qualified to take the course, the student may enroll. The student must accept full responsibility for fulfilling the course requirements and for the grade earned. 

Even if the student has successfully completed a graduate-level course, it will satisfy degree requirements for a bachelor’s degree only by special permission of the Dean. Approval for graduate-level courses to be applied toward the requirements for a bachelor’s degree is not guaranteed, but rather is granted on a case-by-case basis. To request such approval, the following procedure should be followed:

  1. The student obtains permission from the instructor of the course and the department to enroll in the graduate-level course;
  2. The student asks his/her academic advisor to submit an exception in the College database;
  3. The Dean reviews the exception request and notifies the academic advisor of the decision;
  4. The academic advisor notifies the student of the decision.

In those cases in which undergraduates are permitted to count graduate-level coursework toward a bachelor’s degree, no more than 12 credit hours will be counted.  Graduate courses taken while an undergraduate and counted toward the requirements of a bachelor’s degree may not count toward a graduate degree at Indiana University (and may also not count toward graduate degrees at other universities).

Graduation
Students must submit an application to graduate. Applications should be submitted online through the College Recorder’s Office according to the following deadlines:

  • May graduation — the previous June 1
  • August graduation — the previous December 1
  • December graduation — the previous March 1

Failure to submit an application by these deadlines may delay graduation.

Candidates for degrees must have all credit on record at least six weeks before the conferral of degrees, except that of the current semester. Credit for current semester enrollment in Indiana University or non-Indiana University programs must be posted on the student’s Indiana University transcript by the last day of the semester in which the student wishes to graduate. Students enrolled in non–Indiana University programs should make arrangements to have their transcripts sent to the Indiana University Office of Admissions on the Bloomington campus as soon as possible once final grades are posted. Students enrolled in programs where grades will be reported after the end of the Indiana University Bloomington semester should apply for the next appropriate graduation date.

Interdepartmental Majors  (B.A.)
Interdepartmental majors are available in some disciplines for students who are pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree and who wish to combine two disciplines or subjects into an interdepartmental concentration area. Such students are required to complete a minimum of 40 credit hours but cannot exceed 62 credit hours in the interdepartmental major. However, a maximum of 22 major credit hours taken in excess of 62 may be counted toward the 122 minimum credit hours required for the degree. In no case may the total of credit hours outside the College and excess major credit hours exceed 22 credit hours.

Matriculation Dates
For an undergraduate student pursuing a degree in the College of Arts and Sciences at Bloomington, the applicable degree requirements are those in effect at the time he or she matriculated at Indiana University (any campus) as a degree-seeking student. Students admitted for the fall semester who elect to take courses in the preceding summer will be bound by the degree requirements in effect for the fall for which they are admitted. A student who fails to complete a degree within eight years of matriculation will forfeit the automatic right to use the requirements in effect at the time of matriculation. Students in this situation with questions about remaining requirements should contact the College Recorder’s Office, Owen Hall.

Noncredit Courses
The College of Arts and Sciences does not grant credit for courses that are considered remedial, such as MATH- M 014, MATH-M 025, SLST-T-060-079 (Intensive English Program) and SLST-T 101 (English Language Improvement). Credit hours, though counting toward enrollment status, do not accrue toward the total number required for a degree in the College. The grades for these courses do not count in the College of Arts and Sciences cumulative grade point average.

ReStart Policy
Students who have been away from Indiana University for at least five years, and who earned grades that make it impossible or very difficult to return to a College of Arts and Sciences degree program, may petition for a "restart." Under a restart, the College of Arts and Sciences will establish a new degree record for the student that will consist of courses previously taken that were completed with a minimum grade of C. Note that all Indiana University course work will remain on the student’s permanent record (the university transcript); this policy will affect only the student’s College of Arts and Sciences record.

Students will be eligible for consideration for this policy once a minimum of five years have passed since full-time or continuous part-time enrollment. Students will need to provide evidence that indicates a significant change in their ability to succeed in academic work. Reevaluation of fundamental skills may be necessary before the student can proceed. Students should petition for a restart as part of the readmission process. Students should contact the Undergraduate Academic Affairs Office, Owen Hall, to begin the petition process and to discuss the details of this policy.

Second Bachelor’s Degrees
In certain cases the Dean may admit Bachelor’s degree holders or students currently pursuing a Bachelor’s degree at IU Bloomington to candidacy for a second Bachelor’s degree. There are two types of second degrees, concurrent and sequential. A concurrent degree is one earned simultaneously with a first degree. A sequential degree is one earned subsequent to a first degree (earned at IUB or elsewhere). Admission to second degree candidacy is a selective process.  Applicants must meet all eligibility requirements. Candidates for second degrees must complete all degree requirements for the College of Arts and Sciences and the major(s) that they are pursuing.

Students interested in pursuing a concurrent second degree should meet with the academic advisor for the intended major of the second degree to discuss both their eligibility and rationale for pursuing a second degree. Students should download the Second Bachelor’s Degree application from the College Recorder’s Office website and complete it before meeting with the advisor. Concurrent applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

Students interested in pursuing a sequential second degree should contact the College at colldeg2@indiana.edu to request application information.  Students who currently hold a Bachelor’s degree and wish to further their education in the same field of study as their first degree or in a closely related field should consider working toward admission to a graduate program instead of pursuing a second Bachelor’s degree.  Students who are certain that they want to pursue a sequential second degree must provide a compelling rationale for pursuing a second Bachelor’s degree and evidence of their commitment to completing the second degree if admitted.  Sequential application deadlines are April 1st for a fall start, and November 1st for a spring start. (International student deadlines are April 1st for a fall start, and September 15 for a spring start.)

Students with Disabilities
Students with a learning disability, hearing impairment, speech impairment, or any other disability that may affect their ability to fulfill a requirement of the College should contact the Office of Disability Services for Students, Franklin Hall 006, (812) 855-7578, prior to registering. Requirements will not be waived for students with disabilities; however, some modifications may be made within specific courses. Students seeking such modifications should do so early in their academic career to ensure timely progress to degree completion.

Student Responsibility
Students are responsible for planning their own programs and for meeting the degree requirements for graduation. For guidance in fulfilling these requirements and in planning a course of study, students should regularly seek out academic counseling from the academic advisors in the departments that offer the major(s), minors(s), and certificates(s) that the students hope to pursue. Although faculty and academic advisors will do their best to aid students, it is ultimately each student’s responsibility to plan an appropriate academic course of study and to fulfill the various degree requirements. Tools designed to help students become familiar with degree requirements and opportunities available in the College of Arts and Sciences include the Bulletinand the Academic Advisement Report (AAR), available through the Student Center in OneStart. Students who need clarification regarding any information on their AAR or any of the requirements for their degree program are urged to contact their academic advisor or the College Recorder's Office (Owen Hall). Indiana University reserves the right to change course offerings without notice. Students are responsible for consulting the online Schedule of Classes for the most up-to-date listing.

Transfer Courses
IU students planning to take a course outside of the IU system for transfer to IUB should contact the Office of Admissions. If the course is not already listed in the Credit Transfer Service (CTS), students will need to submit appropriate materials to that office and fill out a Credit Transfer Agreement (CTA) once the Office of Admissions has determined whether and how the non-IU course will transfer to IUB. Students are encouraged to contact Admissions in a timely fashion, as there are deadlines for requesting course approval. If a student misses the deadline for course evaluation and still wishes to take the non-IU course in question, the student may elect to enroll in a non-IU course and request an evaluation for course transfer after the course has been completed. However, in this case, there is no guarantee that the course will transfer to IUB transfer nor that specific course credit will be awarded.

Undistributed Course Work
Transfer courses that are not equated to a specific IUB course are denoted on a student’s transcript as undistributed, with a departmental designation followed by UN and then level. (For example, POLS-UN 300 would be an undistributed Political Science course at the 300-level.) While these hours count as credit toward graduation, they do not fulfill specific course requirements, such as distribution or major requirements. Students who wish to have undistributed course work evaluated for general distribution (as Arts & Humanities, Social & Historical Studies, or Natural & Mathematical Sciences) should contact the academic advisor in the appropriate department. The academic advisor will evaluate the course and notify the Recorder’s Office, Owen Hall if the course is approved for general distribution credit.

Students who wish to have undistributed course work evaluated for their major, minor, or certificate should contact the academic advisor in the appropriate department.

The Undergraduate Academic Affairs Office will evaluate undistributed course work for Culture Studies (including Global Civilizations and Cultures and Diversity in the US) credit. Student should submit appropriate course materials along with the appropriate form.

Withdrawals from Courses
The College permits withdrawal from courses with the automatic grade of W (Withdrawal) until the end of the eighth week of classes during the regular academic year, until the end of the fourth week of classes for eight-week courses, and until the end of the first two weeks of classes during a summer session. See the Enrollment and Student Academic Information Bulletin for deadline dates for a particular semester.

Petitions for withdrawal after the periods specified above will not be authorized by the Dean except for urgent reasons beyond the student’s control related to extended illness or equivalent distress. The desire to avoid a low grade is not an acceptable reason for withdrawal from a course.

If students withdraw with the Dean’s consent, their grade in the course will be W if they are passing at the time of withdrawal and F if they are not passing. As with all grades, instructors will assign the appropriate grade. The grade will be recorded on the date of withdrawal. Failure to complete a course without authorized withdrawal will result in a grade of F. The grade of W may not be assigned for a course when a student has taken the final exam, or completed the final paper or project for the course.