ASURE Courses & Experiences

The application is open

Seats are limited. Although the priority deadline has passed, we are still accepting applications for ASURE Interdisciplinary.

Apply for ASURE

Second semester research experiences

ASURE Interdisciplinary students will enroll in one of the following:

LING-L 245 Language and Computers

Have you ever encountered abusive or offensive social media posts? Abusive social media is becoming a serious issue, and because so many posts are made every day we cannot remove abusive posts by hand—removal must be automated. But how does automatic detection work? In this class we will discuss what abusive language is and consider how it differs based on the group it addresses (e.g. sexist, racist). Then we’ll learn about automatic approaches to language analysis (i.e. what is behind Siri or Alexa), and learn just a bit of programming. By the end of the course, you will develop, experiment with, and assess your own method for automatic detection of abusive posts.

Eligibility: Open to freshmen who completed an ASURE Interdisciplinary course during their first semester.
Degree requirements fulfilled: This course fulfills the College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) and the General Education Natural and Mathematical Sciences requirements.
Instructor:
Sandra Kübler, Department of Linguistics

ARTH-A 200 Topics in Art History

Held in collaboration with the Eskenazi Museum of Art, this course will provide you with the opportunity to explore the history of ancient Greek and Roman fashion through the hands-on process of organizing a museum exhibition from initial concept to final installation. You will select artworks related to ancient fashion from the museum’s collection and research these objects with an eye to presenting them to the general public. You will also meet curators, conservators, designers, and museum education specialists. The exhibition (curated by the class) will open to the public at the end of the spring semester.

Eligibility: Open to freshmen who completed an ASURE Interdisciplinary course during their first semester.
Degree requirements fulfilled: This course fulfills the College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) Arts and Humanities requirement.
Instructor: Julie Van Voorhis, Department of Art History

FRIT-F 226 French Society: Topics

How does the look, feel, or sound of a cultural object make us feel? In this course on material culture and emotions, we will use physical artefacts from early modern France as a case study to explore a history of emotions — specifically anger, anxiety, compassion, disgust, laughter, grief, love, and tears. Reading, viewing, and listening assignments will be combined with several visits to cognition labs across campus to approach our objects of study using both theoretical and experimental methodologies. In your final project, you will choose one object for which you will write literature reviews and design and conduct a small-scale emotional response experiment.

Eligibility: Open to freshmen who completed an ASURE Interdisciplinary course during their first semester.
Degree requirements fulfilled: This course fulfills the College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) Social and Historical Studies requirement as well as the General Education Social and Historical Studies and World Languages and Cultures requirements.
Instructor: Alison Calhoun, Department of French and Italian

SLST-S 213 Multilingual Brain and Behavior Discovery Experience

What is it you know when you “know” a language? Can you acquire a first and second language equally well? This research experience provides you with training in language data analysis techniques addressing these questions and related topics in multilingualism. You will extract, treat, and analyze data sets from existing corpora and from research developed at Indiana University. It provides a general introduction to the scientific method for the study of language. You will develop knowledge and skills transferrable to careers in the social, cognitive, and behavioral sciences through work with data management tools and software used in quantitative linguistic research.

Eligibility: Open to freshmen who completed an ASURE Interdisciplinary course during their first semester.
Instructor: Mike Iverson, Department of Second Language Studies

SOC-S 105 Sociology Laboratory

How do scholars communicate with the public? How can sociologists translate their work in ways that inform the public and improve policymaking (a practice often known as public sociology)? In this workshop, we'll read articles and books about the media, learn how scholars define and understand the role of public sociology, and analyze how the media interprets scientific research. For your final project, you will make a video or podcast about a scientific topic.

Eligibility: Open to freshmen who completed an ASURE Interdisciplinary course during their first semester.
Degree requirements fulfilled: This course fulfills the College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) and the General Education Social and Historical Studies requirements.
Instructor: Fabio Rojas, Department of Sociology

CMLT-C 200 Honors Seminar

The Odyssey—one of the oldest surviving works of European literature—continues to inspire authors, playwrights, and filmmakers, from Atwood to Walcott to the Coen brothers. Explore these adaptations and learn why Homer’s tales of Troy, which question ideals of honor and glory, reckon the human cost of warfare, and find heroism in human experience, remain necessary today. Learn to reinvent myths for new audiences and examine the nature of adaptation. Finally, through in-class workshops, create your own adaptation.

Eligibility: Open to freshmen who completed an ASURE Interdisciplinary course during their first semester.
Degree requirements fulfilled: This course fulfills the College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) and the General Education Arts and Humanities requirements.
Instructor: Sarah Van der Laan, Department of Comparative Literature

HIST-W 200 Issues in World History

Are you taking pictures? I am sure you have a lot of photos, picturing your life, family, and friends. How can we use photographs in history research and practice? “Photographing History” is focused on the visual representations of history through photography, what photographs can tell us about society, politics, culture and everyday life in the late nineteenth—twenty-first century and how we can “read” (analyze) photographs as constructed images and narratives. You will learn how we can visualize history and incorporate photographs into research and practice; how to “look” at photographs as primary sources and see the “invisible” in photos, how to use photographs as documents which tell stories about people and historical events. We will be working with photograph collections online and onsite in the IU archives, libraries, and museums, improving our visual literacy.

Eligibility: Open to freshmen who completed an ASURE Interdisciplinary course during their first semester.
Degree requirements fulfilled: This course fulfills the College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) Social and Historical Studies requirement as well as the General Education Social and Historical Studies and World Languages and Cultures requirements. 
Instructor: Tatiana Saburova, Department of History

HIST-W 200 Issues in World History

How do you make a revolution? This course enables you to learn about the dynamics of revolutionary change through role-playing games on the American and French Revolutions. These world-shaking events were intimately intertwined. French help was crucial to Patriot victory, while American support for French revolutionaries created political turmoil in the young American republic. On both sides of the Atlantic, debate revolved around a common body of writings by political theorists such as Rousseau, Burke, Locke, and Paine. You will become a character in each national scenario, conduct in-depth research on your character, delve into key writings on political theory, and produce a final video-based project that compares the games’ outcomes with the historical record.

Eligibility: Open to freshmen who completed an ASURE Interdisciplinary course during their first semester.
Degree requirements fulfilled: This course fulfills the College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) Social and Historical Studies requirement as well as the General Education Social and Historical Studies and World Languages and Cultures requirements.
Instructor: Carl Weinberg, Department of History and the Political and Civic Engagement (PACE) program

SPHS-S 209 Topics in Speech and Hearing Sciences

This research experience will explore how speech patterns are influenced by our identities and what speech can (and cannot) reveal about us. Topics will include gender, language background, sexual orientation, race and ethnicity, home region, age, and peer-group affiliation. You will become active participants in the research process by collecting and analyzing data, including dialect surveys, digital recordings, and perceptual judgements, and will embark on larger-scale research projects.

Eligibility: Open to freshmen who completed an ASURE Interdisciplinary course during their first semester.
Degree requirements fulfilled: This course fulfills the College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) Natural and Mathematical Sciences requirement.
Instructor: Tessa Bent, Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences

ENG-L 240 Literature and Public Life

Racial tensions and violence in our society call for constructive response from the college classroom, one that students coproduce as equipment for living in a world of complex challenges. This course begins with an interdisciplinary inquiry into white rage and white nationalism, before turning to two literary works that address race matters through counter-storytelling and transformative mediation. Applying these skills, and with basic training from Community Justice and Mediation Center (a local non-profit), the class will work with students from an alternative high school on on-the-ground issues, thereby helping to coproduce civil conversation that is, at heart, democracy in action.

Eligibility: Open to freshmen who completed an ASURE Interdisciplinary course during their first semester.
Degree requirements fulfilled: This course fulfills the College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) and the General Education Arts and Humanities requirements.
Instructor: Joan Pong Linton, Department of English

CLAS-C 212 Seven Wonders of the Ancient World

The ancient Greeks and Romans identified seven wonders of their ancient Mediterranean world. This course explores how these monuments have been interpreted and imagined from antiquity to the present, using literary and material evidence, with emphasis on technology of construction and the cultural criteria that makes a monument a "wonder." You will explore ancient technology through experiential learning, design a hypothetical textbook for the course, and conduct and present research on a site or monument that you deem worthy of being the eighth wonder of the ancient world.

Eligibility: Open to freshmen who completed an ASURE Interdisciplinary course during their first semester.
Degree requirements fulfilled: This course fulfills the College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) Arts and Humanities and Global Civilizations and Cultures requirements.
Instructor:
Nicholas G. Blackwell, Department of Classical Studies

Third semester research experiences

ASURE Sciences students who wish to continue the ASURE program in their sophomore year will enroll in one of the following:

BIOL-X 325 ASURE Biology Research Lab 2

This is the second in a two-lab sequence for ASURE program students. You will continue guided research related to the work you began in BIOL-X 150. Projects will be progressively more complex and you will work more independently in the commission of the research.

Prerequisite: BIOL-X 150
Degree requirements fulfilled: Students majoring in Biology, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Human Biology, and Molecular Life Sciences will earn elective/lab, and College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) Intensive Writing credit for participation in this course.
Instructor: Michael Manzella, Department of Biology

BIOL-X 325 ASURE Biology Research Lab 2

This is the second in a two-lab sequence for ASURE program students. You will continue guided research related to the work you began in BIOL-X 150. Projects will be progressively more complex and you will work more independently in the commission of the research.

Prerequisite: BIOL-X 150
Degree requirements fulfilled: Students majoring in Biology, Animal Behavior, Human Biology, and Molecular Life Sciences will earn elective/lab, and College of Arts and Sciences Education (CASE) Intensive Writing credit for participation in this course.
Instructor: Megan Murphy, Department of Biology

BIOL-X 325 ASURE Biology Research Lab 2

This is the second in a two-lab sequence for ASURE program students. You will continue guided research related to the work you began in BIOL-X 150. Projects will be progressively more complex and you will work more independently in the commission of the research.

Prerequisite: BIOL-X 150
Degree requirements fulfilled: Students majoring in Biology and Human Biology will earn elective/lab credit for participation in this course.
Instructor: Jennifer Lau, Department of Biology

BIOT-X 325 ASURE Biotechnology Research Lab 2

This is the second in a two-lab sequence for ASURE program students. You will continue guided research related to the work you began in BIOT-X 150. Projects will be progressively more complex and you will work more independently in the commission of the research.

Prerequisite: BIOT-X 150
Degree requirements fulfilled: Students majoring in Biology, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Human Biology, and Molecular Life Sciences will earn elective/lab credit for participation in this course.
Instructor: Ankur Dalia, Department of Biology

CHEM-X 325 ASURE Chemistry Research Lab 2

This is the second in a two-lab sequence for ASURE program students. You will continue guided research related to the work you began in CHEM-X 150. Projects will be progressively more complex and you will work more independently in the commission of the research.

Prerequisite: CHEM-X 150
Degree requirements fulfilled: Students majoring in Biotechnology, Chemistry, Human Biology, Molecular Life Sciences, and Biochemistry will earn elective/lab credit for participation in this course.
Instructors: Martha Oakley and Laura Brown, Department of Chemistry

EAS-E 490 Undergraduate Seminar

This is the second in a two-lab sequence for ASURE program students. You will continue guided research related to the work you began in EAS-E 190. Projects will be progressively more complex and you will work more independently in the commission of the research.

Prerequisite: EAS-E 190
Degree requirements fulfilled: Students majoring in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences will earn 300-400 level credit for participation in this course.

Questions about ASURE?

Contact us at asure@iu.edu.

The application is open

Seats are limited. Although the priority deadline has passed, we are still accepting applications for ASURE Interdisciplinary.

Apply for ASURE